What to Know About Corepower Yoga Prices Before Heading to a Class

Advice

With over 220 studios, Corepower Yoga is certainly one of the biggest names in the game. And unlike more traditional yoga studios, it offers strength and sculpting classes that use weights, in addition to traditional vinyasa, heated, and unheated yoga. This makes it a great option for those who are interested in yoga, but also want to focus on strength training, especially in terms of getting bang for your buck. But what does Corepower yoga pricing look like anyway? And what exactly are you paying for?

Corepower offers three levels of traditional vinyasa yoga, named C1, C2, and C3. C1 focuses on the fundamentals of yoga in an unheated room. C2 is a heated, intermediate approach that’s more focused on challenging postures, and C3 is a high-intensity vinyasa class that’s best for advanced practitioners. In addition to traditional yoga, Corepower also offers two strength-focused classes: Yoga Sculpt and Corepower Strength X. Yoga Sculpt is a heated class that combines yoga, cardio and strength moves; whereas Corepower Strength X is completely focused on strength training, and takes place in an unheated room.

Corepower gets points for class variety, and can be a great option for those who like to balance yoga and strength training. To see if that balance pays off, we tracked down all the info on Corepower’s prices. Ahead, here’s everything you need to know about Corepower yoga pricing, Corepower membership, and class pack costs.

Corepower Yoga Prices

Corepower offers both class packages and monthly memberships, so that you can pick the option that best suits your needs and schedule. Pricing ranges by location, so to get a good range, we compared three studios in Kansas City, KS, Los Angeles, and downtown New York City (Bryant Park location). While NYC is naturally at the far end of the spectrum, you can expect your pricing to fall somewhere in between, depending on the region you live in.

Before you buy, note that Corepower also offers 20% off of new purchases of All Access Memberships or Class Packs to students, military, first responders, teachers, and seniors (55+).

Corepower Yoga Membership

There are several membership options to choose from, depending on your interest and needs. Here’s a breakdown, with expected cost:

  • All Access Membership (ranges from $159-$259/month): Corepower’s All Access Membership is truly all access. Members get unlimited access to in-person and online classes, plus additional perks like a monthly buddy pass and occasional gear discounts. Additionally, All Access Members can visit any studio, not just their home studio. If you practice frequently or travel often, this is the membership for you.
  • Unlimited Studio Pass ($119, Kansas City): With this membership, you can take unlimited in-studio classes, at your home studio or at another location. It’s a great choice for those who prefer to work out inside the studio, and don’t need online access to classes. Note: not all locations offer it.
  • At Home Membership ($49/month, currently $19.99/month with code ATHOME19): Corepower’s At Home Membership is the most budget-friendly way to practice with Corepower, and it’s perfect for those who fell in love with home workouts during the pandemic and never want to give them up. For $19.99/month, you get unlimited access to both livestream and on-demand classes, so you can practice wherever, whenever. If you love the convenience of working out at home, and prefer to skip sweaty studios, this is a great option for you.

Corepower Class Pack Cost

If your schedule is less predictable, or if you’re more of an occasional yogi, class packs might be the best membership option for you. The more classes you buy, the longer you have to use them. Even better: like the All Access Membership, they’re valid at any Corepower location. Here’s how the pricing breaks down:

  • One studio class: prices range from $29-$40
    • Good for 30 days, and can be used at any Corepower Yoga studio.
  • Five studio classes: prices range from $139-$189
    • Good for six months, and can be used at any Corepower Yoga studio.
  • Ten studio classes: prices range from $235-$359
    • Good for one year, and can be used at any Corepower Yoga studio.
  • Twenty studio classes: prices range from $440-$699
    • Good for one year, and can be used at any Corepower Yoga studio.
  • Thirty studio classes: prices range from $645-$999
    • Good for 18 months, and can be used at any Corepower Yoga studio.
  • Fifty studio classes: prices range from $1,025-$1,645
    • Good for one year, and can be used at any Corepower Yoga studio.

You can also buy class packs for Corepower’s virtual livestream classes, which cost $18 for a single livestream class, or $75 for five livestream classes.

If you prefer in-person classes but are not sure if Corepower is right for you, the fitness chain offers a free week of unlimited classes–no credit card required to sign up. If you try it and love it, new members can sign up for the All Access Membership (more on that below) for $99–$129 for their first month.

Additional Corepower Yoga Costs

Yoga is a famously low-equipment workout, but if there’s one thing you can’t go without, it’s a yoga mat. Whether you need a grippy surface for downward dog, or comfortable padding for child’s pose, a yoga mat is simply a non-negotiable for class.

Corepower offers mats for rental, and while prices vary by studio, you can expect to pay around $2-$4 for mat rental. For the hot yoga classes, you can also rent a towel for around the same price. Yoga mats are incredibly affordable, so if you’re planning on attending regularly, you’ll probably want to invest in your own.

You’ll also want to note that while All Access Members are able to take classes at any location, certain studios (currently just New York City) do have surcharges.

Kaley Rohlinger is a freelance writer for PS who focuses on health, fitness, food, and lifestyle content. She has a background in the marketing and communications industry and has written for PS for over four years.

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